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COVID-19 Vendée

France will end audience capacity limits for concert halls, sporting matches and other events from February 2, part of a gradual lifting of the current Covid-19 restrictions. The lifting of restrictions is despite the high number of infected (20 016 in Vendée in just 7 days’ time) made possible by a vaccine pass that will be required for most public areas starting Monday 24th January. Keep following the rules, it is the best ammunition against the pandemic. French Government UPDATE 10/01/2022 Vaccine: the gap between second and third immunizations (or positive covid) is reduced to 3 months No curfew or lockdown Restaurants: no limitation of customers but must be vigilant about mask/social distancing/ health pass checks. No consumption while standing. Tests: no longer mandatory to perform a PCR test to confirm a positive antigen test. BUT, after a positive SELF-test, a PCR test is  required. Schools: Parents will no longer be …

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Tourism & hospitality in the Vendée: surviving the immediate future

We have been asked to share our thoughts about whether or not there will be tourism in the Vendée this season. To address this, means we feel it important to address tourism & hospitality in general, as that will inevitably affect what happens in our department. The following are musings and logical thinking as having lived – and survived – 9/11 working for a major airline and related hotel industry, applying the gravity of a pandemic and its possible repercussions. 1/Is Covid-19 here to stay? The answer to this question seems quite logical: as long as the disease spreads and without a vaccine to inoculate the masses, yes, unfortunately Covid-19 is a long-term global health crisis we’ll have to deal with or work around. If we reach back to 9/11/2001, the world came to a standstill in the wake of a shocking terrorism attack that delivered a gut-punch to air …

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Expatriate in lock-down France

In recent years, the thought has crossed my mind many times that if anything could keep me from my mother in Belgium, it might be World War III. Never had I considered a virus-related near-global quarantine. But the very first day of lock down in France my worst nightmare as an expat and as an only child, delivered a punch in the face: my mother, who lives independently, took a nasty tumble down the stairs in the middle of the night. It was the third time she would be in hospital this year, and the eighth time since my husband and I moved to Europe from the US after announcing she didn’t want to fly anymore, anywhere, let alone across the ocean. But when I think back in my expat life of twenty-eight years, it is only the third time that I have experienced a roller-coaster of stress as extreme …